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Category: T-Shirts

Re-Test Your “Failed” Designs

This post is for anyone selling shirts, necklaces or any physical products on Facebook.

Facebook is a strange beast. There are times where it’s almost too easy to sell, an item just converts and no one can wipe the grin off your face. Then there are times when for whatever reason Facebook just does not convert. Maybe they’re updating the algorithm or maybe it’s an unseasonal time in your niche. For whatever reason your amazing designs that were destined to make loads of money like your previous ones failed. They failed miserably.

Maybe you’re not that experienced with Facebook advertising. Well don’t worry because this post is for you too. Maybe you’re having a really hard time to crack your first real winner. I know not easy to find your first winner that get hundreds of sales but hang in there because when you do find an item that get hundreds of orders you’ve just hit the jackpot. I don’t just mean for that one campaign. You should have built an audience you can survey to get future ideas from AND you’ll have a seasoned pixel along with a Lookalike audience.

A seasoned pixel and a lookalike audience are some of your greatest assets you will because they will make it a lot more easier to sell shirts.

When you finally come across that elusive successful campaign Facebook will track all the conversions for that shirt and this will provide you with a lucrative seasoned pixel. Now with that data it should become easier to get sales. Facebook now has a good profile of who your buyers are and your ads will target people who share similarities with those buyers.

From that successful campaign you should also have gained a Lookalike Audience. The best way to create a Lookalike Audience that works for me is to create it based off of people who visited the URL in your ad. Make sure you build a custom audience of people who visit the product URL in your ad. For instance if Facebook pixeled 2,000 people that landed on your destination page, they are highly relevant. You can create a lookalike or LAA audience from those 2,000 people and gain an audience of 2,000,0000+ that consist of a similar profile to those who visited your product page.

You now own some data that can make you serious money. First off you can go broad in your targeting with your LAA and continue to get a nice flow of sales. Secondly you can go broad and just let your seasoned pixel find the buyers. You’ll get better results when you use them together.

What’s the point of my post?

This is a reminder. A reminded to re-try all your failed campaigns you had prior to your big winner.

Let’s say you tried to crack a niche over and over again. You created 100 designs and 5-10 of those were really promising but for whatever reason they flopped. You surveyed your audience and done all your research, it should have sold but it didn’t.

When you finally get that campaign that sells, you become the owner of the pixel that knows who your buyers are and you have a LAA that converts really well. It’s time to retry those “failed campaigns” because this time they will get shown to people who buy.

Why? Facebook HAS to show your ad to your proven to convert LAA audience if you tell it target your LAA in your ad.

I had a campaign that I tested four times previously and it failed each time. I knew people liked my design because of the results from a survey I did. Not only that, people were buying the shirt in my store frequently with no advertising. However nothing happened when I tried to sell it on Facebook so I left it and never tried to run it again.

Eventually I came across some very successful campaigns where I sold over 600 shirts in one month. I now had a seasoned conversion pixel and a LAA full of buyers. With my new powerful data I decided to start testing my failed campaigns. This time my results were completely different. For every $10 spent I am getting 6-7 conversions. Each conversion is $15 in profit.

The campaign failed four times previously but now with all this powerful data Facebook is sending my advert to buyers and they love this shirt.

I feel this is a very important post. How many failed designs do you have that you never intend to test again? If you have a seasoned pixel and a LAA then I suggest you try them again because you could be digging three feet from gold!

EDIT ———

I have come back into this post two weeks later (Today is March 2nd). I want to try and prove my point.

At the time of writing this post I had launched a previous unsuccessful shirt. It was kind of case study for this post that’s actually gone quite well.

I attempted to launch this shirt at the end of 2014 and I tried a couple more times in 2015 with no luck. I got some sales here and there but it ended up breaking even. I gave this design fair chance and after getting no results I forgot about it.

Throughout the end 2015 and the beginning of 2016 I generated a lot of sales on my pixel for this niche with other t-shirt designs. That’s when I decided to test this design again with my seasoned pixel that inspired this post. Take a look at my results.

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 15.39.41

I re-launched this shirt to my niche and in less than 14 days this shirt generated $5,000 in revenue and I am just getting started. I’m not ramping the ad-spend up like I used to. I have just kept my budget on a steady at $10 a day for four ad-sets. I have spent no more than $50 a day and will continue to do keep my spend low. I haven’t even moved into targeting the lookalike audience yet so I anticipate that this shirt will have another month worth of sales in it at least.

Now all my old shirts will be coming out of the woodwork. I have at least 15 “failed” campaigns like this one in this niche that I can’t wait to test again. Let’s say this campaign only makes $5k revenue and all my other “failed” 15 designs go on to make $5k revneue each… Then that would be $80,000 in revenue that I left laying on the table if I did not test my old designs. I think another test is well worth it.

So there you have it. Once you have a seasoned pixel make sure you go back through your old campaigns and give them another run because you could be digging three feet from gold!

Do You Sell T-Shirts On Facebook? Survey Your Audience

millbank-view

My view of London at Fabcon 2015, inside the Millbank Tower.

Recently people have been reaching out to me for advice on what T-Shirt course they should take. I always send them to the videos from Fabcon 2015. The content shared in these videos is all you need to get started not only because they are free to watch but also because the content is really good.

These videos contain the same content that the most expensive T-Shirt course is teaching. Training that I paid thousands of dollars to learn is inside these videos. Save your money because this is all you need to get started.

Back in February I attended Fabcon 2015 in London. It was an event put together by Fabrily and Teespring.

They managed to bring in guest speakers from all over the world who have been very successful with selling t-shirts online. Arjun Ohri was one of those speakers and his talk was really REALLY good. Not only was he a great public speaker but the content he shared was worth so much more than what everyone paid for the event.

I know because last year I spent a lot of money on a Teespring course and Arjun uses similar strategies which he shared that day at Fabcon.

Luckily for you Fabrily recorded all the speakers at the event and put the videos on their blog so that other sellers can benefit. The stuff Arjun shares in this video, particularly the part about surveying your audience, is really worth paying attention to.

Below is Arjun’s presentation from Fabcon 2015. Make sure you take notes!

IMPORTANT: You should also watch the rest of the videos from that day and you can put everything Arjun teaches into action. Follow his advice and you will sell t-shirts. All the videos from that day can be found here: http://fabrilyblog.com/2015/03/13/fabcon-2015-videos/

Watch the video and try to use what he teaches in your t-shirt selling strategy. The content in these videos is enough to get you on the right track.

Andy

How To Get Started Making Money With Facebook

This is my attempt at a crash course guide to making money with Facebook and selling physical products.

First you need create a brand your audience can relate to.

The first thing you want to do is pick a niche that buy products online. You can do this by searching other fan pages on Facebook or if it’s t-shirts you want to sell then have a look at other t-shirt sites online and look at what niches t-shirts are selling well in.

Here is an example, I just checked http://teeview.phatograph.com/ and if you scroll through the pages of best Screen Shot 2014-12-23 at 01.34.05selling t-shirts you can get an idea of many niches where people will buy t-shirts. It’s also a good guess that they were purchased through Facebook.

The t-shirt I have found here is aimed at women who are in the army/military. It’s not my design. It shows over 1800 sold which tells us that the niche is probably a good one to go after.

You also need to make sure that the audience is big enough. It’s best to choose a niche where Facebook allows you to reach over one million people. It sounds like a lot but when you find out who your buyers are and narrow down your audience it becomes a lot smaller.

Now you have picked a niche you need to create a fan page on Facebook. Make sure that the name is something the people in the niche can relate to.

After the page is created you need to build an audience to the page using a like campaign. Test test test.

Test everything. Set a low budget of $5 a day per ad and create five ads. Only change the image for each ad, keep everything else the same. Let the ads run for three to four days. After you find a winning image (where the cost per like is the lowest) you can pause all the other ads. Next you need to clone the winning ad four times and test five different headlines. Again let them run and find the lowest cost per like. Duplicate the ad several times and let them run.

After a couple of weeks depending on your budget and cost per like you should have 5,000-10,000 fans on your page.

Do not just let them sit there! Create content, viral content using memes and videos. Try to use content that lets them stay on Facebook. Content that takes people away from Facebook get’s low reach because Facebook do not want people to leave their website!

Another tip is, as long as you pay for ads your reach will stay strong. As soon as you stop spending money your reach will drop.

The next step once you have an audience is to search for viral content in your niche and turn it into a t-shirt.

After you promote your product to your page, spend $20 on ads aimed at your page and let them run all day and overnight. If you wake up in profit it’s time to scale your ad campaign to the rest of your niche not just your tiny 10,000 audience.

Anyway after you have done it once it can be repeated again. Like I said, a scalable design is the best way to get started with selling t-shirts. Find a design that will sell and can be scaled into other niches.

An example of a scalable design is the t-shirt I shared earlier in this post. That phrase “some girls play house, real girls defend our country” was taken into lot’s of niches. There was fishing, driving and sport versions of the same phrase. “Some girls play house, real girls play football”. The point is that the phrase can be adapted into many niches. In the army niche alone it sold 1800+ in one campaign which is over $20,000 from one t-shirt. If that person was that successful in five other niches then that one phrase was worth $100,000.

Don’t waste time procrastinating. It’s easier to get started than you think!

That’s all I could get out in one sitting. I might add a video to this post at some point to show you how to find an audience on Facebook. It’s something I barely touched on in this post and it’s one of the most important parts of a successful campaign.

Please comment below if you have any questions.

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